News & Insights: jennifer prendamano

9 Tips for Sales and Use Tax Audits


By Jennifer Prendamano  |  February 4, 2022

As states look to strengthen their post-pandemic economies, take these steps to plan for a potential audit as well as negotiate the test period with an auditor.

Remote Workers May Owe New York Income Tax, Even If They Haven’t Set Foot in the State


By Jennifer Prendamano |  James (Jay) M. Brower, Jr.  |  October 1, 2021

Taxpayers who work for a New York-based company may be surprised to find they still owe New York State income taxes even after a successful domicile change.

Updated Guidance: The Pass-through Entity Tax in New York State: Overview and FAQ


By James (Jay) M. Brower, Jr. |  Jennifer Prendamano  |  August 26, 2021

On Wednesday, August 25, 2021, the New York Department of Taxation and Finance issued its first round of guidance on the new Pass-Through Entity Tax.  Read our updated guide and find answers to frequently asked questions for the latest on the PTE tax.

New York City Commercial Rent Tax – Don’t Be Caught Unaware


By Jennifer Prendamano  |  August 20, 2021

Commercial tenants in Manhattan may not know that they are subject to New York City’s Commercial Rent Tax (“CRT”) law. But they should inform themselves – and examine their lease agreements – or risk being hit with unexpected penalties. 

Qualifying for Home Office Deduction in Current Times


By Jennifer Prendamano |  Laura E. LaForgia  |  July 28, 2021

The home office deduction is a good news/bad news story. It’s good for self-employed individuals, who may take the deduction on federal tax returns. It’s bad for W2 employees, who may not take the federal deduction. However, some states have expanded the deduction since COVID-19 sent millions of workers home.

State Residency and Tax Issues During COVID-19


By Jennifer Prendamano  |  November 12, 2020

Due to COVID-19, many individuals have decided to, at least temporarily, move out of more populated areas to take up residence in vacation homes or other dwellings that are located in other states.  This has the potential to cause a dual residency issue for these individuals as both the state they left and the state they moved to may consider them residents for income tax purposes.